Green, Red, Black and Female

I recently read a very moving and persuasive article on Truth-Out.org, one of my progessive blog reading indulgences.  It was so powerfully written that I can’t help sharing some of my favorite quotes and some of the questions it flooded into my mind.  The Future Must Be Green, Red, Black and Female just had one of those titles that grabbed my attention and demanded to be read.

Robert Jensen is an outspoken activist and constantly inspires on how to make things happen in the future.

Our task today is not to scurry around trying to hold onto the world as we know it, but to focus on how we can hold onto our humanity as we enter a distinctly different era of the human presence on the planet, an era that will challenge our resolve and reserves.

 This point of view seems to be an essential part of the thought process of all of my friends and peers, we assume that we are creating the world we will live in.  But the challenging portion is that we don’t necessarily imagine that the world we will live in is nothing like the world of our parents, even less then how their world was like that of their parents.  There has been a fundamental shift in the power balance of the world; our population and consumerism have done nothing but grow for centuries, but can they continue to do that?

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What would commitment mean?

I find myself almost daily asking the same question.  What do I need in my life?

The question comes up not as a list of all the things to be kept, but as a searing, train-of-thought stopping “Do I really need THIS in my life?” whenever I’m doing something particularly heinous.  Like washing dishes or staying up until 3 am to build a model.  There is something about doing difficult things that results in a knee-jerk wishful thought that maybe I don’t have to do this.

Its human nature to think of a simpler, lazier way out.  Laziness is an essential part of our creativity.  Otherwise we would still be walking and carrying everything we owned on our backs rather than inventing the wheel.  Maybe my generation has come to value the lazy part of human nature too much.  This is why a recent Harvard study found that 56% of my peers don’t graduate from a 4 year program in 6 years.  A multitude of reasons could lead to this statistic: difficulty of classes, hatred of teachers, inability to time manage, rising tuition cost, irrelevance to the job market and probably a million more.  These reasons center on how lazy we’ve become at defining the importance of college.  It’s not enough for us to know “college is important.”  If that’s all we know then when the inevitable stress begins and we ask “Do I really need this?” the answer will be no.

My long time mentor, Augie Turak, just wrote a post on Forbes.com calling out people who are crippled by thinking just like that.  He describes the red hot heart of leadership as the willingness to commit to, not just what you’re doing, but why you’re doing it.  For me, that means that you have a reason to say yes.  I’ve been in Architecture school for a year now and inevitably when it’s 3 am and the 3rd night of glueing tiny pieces of bass wood together the question always comes up.  And I answer yes because one of the first things Augie every told me he wrote in this post:

It is not the failure to succeed that produces despair. It is the failure to try.

A person will never be successful at something if he/she doesn’t try.  Trying every difficult thing is important – more important is having a reason to try every difficult thing.  Without a reason, there is no commitment.  With a reason there is an answer to doubt.  Being committed is to be so focused on the reason that every other action is in service to that reason.  In many ways commitment is the opposite of balance, but commitment actually can’t exist without the questioning of it.  The very act of questioning, of doubting strengthens our commitment to important things that are worth difficulty (building a model) and also gives us the power to let go of difficult things that are unnecessary and unhealthy to keep in our lives (building a model at 3 am).  Laziness is part of the equation, it’s what fuels the doubt in difficult times, but we can’t be committed to being lazy.  Commitment to the idea of not having to carry our stuff means we worked hard to invent the wheel.